Bibliography for Jewish and Christian Hells

Works by Visionary’s Name, Author’s Name or Title

A B C D E F G H I J K L
M–N O P–Q R S T U–V W–X–Y Z

Abbreviations

Related Topics

A

The Vision of Adamnán, Irish, early 10th C.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

  • Leabhar Braec. The Speckled Book. Dublin: Royal Irish Academy, 1876, 2:253–56. Facsimile of Leabhar Braec (The Speckled Book) manuscript, containing the Celtic text of the Vision of Adamnán.
  • Leabhar na H–Uidhri. The Book of the Dun Cow. Ed. by Moelmuiri Mac Ceileachair. Dublin: Royal Irish Academy, 1870, 27–31. Facsimile of Leabhar na H–Uidhri (The Book of the Dun Cow) manuscript. Introduction provides a description of the manuscript, containing the Celtic text of the Vision of Adamnán.
  • Leabhar na H–Uidhri. The Book of the Dun Cow. Ed. by Richard I. Best and Osborn Bergin. Dublin: Royal Irish Academy, 1929, 67–76. Facsimile of Leabhar na H–Uidhri (The Book of the Dun Cow) manuscript, containing the Celtic text of the Vision of Adimnán.
  • Boswell, C.S. An Irish Precursor of Dante: A Study of the Vision of Heaven and Hell Ascribed to the Eighth Century Irish Saint Adamnán. Grimm Library, 18. London: D. Nutt, 1908; rpt. New York, 1972, pp. 28–47. Introduction on the historical Adamnán and his relationship to this text. Discusses briefly the two manuscripts. Provides an English translation of the Dun Cow text, Leabhar na H–Uidhri.
  • Colwell, James Joseph. “Fis Adamnán: A Comparative Study, with Introduction, Text, and Commentary based on the verision of the Lebor na Huidre.” Ph.D. Diss.: University of Edinburgh, 1952.
  • Stokes, Whitley. Fis Adamnain. Simla, 1870. Includes an annotated transcription and translation from the Book of the Dun Cow.
  • [Stokes, Whitley.] Mac da Cherda. Fraser’s Magazine 83, n.s. 3: (1871): 184–94. A publications of Stokes' annotated English translation (above) with a very brief introduction covering mss, language, and date.
  • [Stokes, Whitley.] Stokes, Margaret. Three Months in the Forests of France. London: G. Bell, 1895, 265–79. Reprinted from the Fraser's Magazine (above).
  • Stokes, Whitley. “Adamnan’s Second Vision.” Revue celtique 12 (1891):420–43. Taken from the lithographic facsimile of the Leabhar Braec (158b–159b), an edition of a second version of the VA in Irish, preceded by four Latin paragraphs, with facing English translation, notes and a brief glossary of unusual Irish words.
  • Vendryes, Joseph. “Aislingthi Adhamnáin d’ après le texte du manuscrit de Paris.” Revue celtique 30 (1909): 349–83. Diplomatic edition of Irish text of the B.N. Paris MS. Fond celtique no. I (fifteenth century) with facing French translation. The text of this manuscript is more closely related to the Dun Cow text.
  • Windisch, Ernst, ed. “Fis Adamnáin; Die Vision des Adamnán.” Irische Texte 1(1880): 165–96. Brief introduction on manuscripts, language, and dating. Presents diplomatic editions of two of the three manuscripts: Leabhar na H–Uidhri (Book of the Dun Cow, c. 1100) and Leabhar Braec (The Speckled Book, late fourteenth century), both from the Royal Irish Academy, Dublin.
  • http://definibus.ucc.ie/keytexts/FA.html

STUDIES

  • Dumville, D. N. “Towards an Interpretation of the Fís Adamnán.” Studia celtica 12–13 (1977–78):62–77. Details editions, translations, and manuscripts, and then proceeds to examine earlier treatments of the text in terms of the eschatology evidenced in the work. Discusses the relationship between the FA and the Visio Pauli. Concludes that the author combined a number of sources with very different backgounds of eschatological thought, which he managed to reconcile into a coherent work.
  • James, M. R. “Syriac Apochypha in Ireland.” Journal of Theological Studies 11 (1910):290–91. Briefly discusses a link between the FA and the Syriac apocryphal work, Obsequies of the Holy Virgin — the clearest evidence James had yet “encountered of obligation on the part of an Irish writer to an oriental text.”
  • James, M. R.
  • Kenney, James, 444–45. Brief discussion of the text, list of mss, and a bibliography up to 1929.
  • Seymour, St. John Drelincount. “The Vision of Adamnán.” Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy 37c.15 (1927): 304–12. Analysis of the VA in its four surviving texts as a composite work of two main divisions, as Boswell charted them (sections 1–20, 31 and perhaps 32 to end, 21–30). The first is based on a four-fold division of souls immediately after death with a description of the ascent of two classes through the seven heavens; the second is a supplement describing the unpleasant side of the otherworld, which Seymour sees as at odds with the rest of the work, presenting unsolved problems.

The Vision of Ailsi, by Peter of Cornwall, Celtic, 1190s

SOURCES & STUDIES
  • Easting, Robert, and Richard Sharpe, ed. “Peter of Cornwall: ‘The Visions of Ailsi and His Sons.” Mediaevistik 1 (1988): 207– 63. Study of Peter of Cornwall’s treatment of the series of visions experienced by Ailsi, with information on Peter, his life and writings, mss of his writings, his sources, and the Cornish background of his work. Presents Latin edition of the text from the Lambeth Palace Library MS 51.
  • Sharpe, Richard, and Peter Hull, ed. and trans. “Peter of Cornwall and Launceston.” Cornish Studies 13 (1985): 5–53. Edition and translation of text with parts of the study that appears in entry above.

The Vision of Alberic, Italian, 1111–23

BIBLIOGRAPHY
SOURCES
  • Bibliotheca Casinensis 5, 1 (1894): 191–206. Latin edition.
  • Cancellieri, Francesco, ed. and trans. Osservazioni intorno alla questione promossa dal Vannozzi del Mazzochi dal Botari especialmente dal P. Abate D. Giuseppe Giustino di Costanzo sopra l’originalità della Divine Commedia, appogiata alla storia della Visione del Monaco Casinese Alberic. Rome: Presso F. Bourlie, 1814.
  • de Vivo, Catello. La Visione di Alberico ristampata, tradotta, e comparata con la Divina Commedia. Ariano: Appula–Irpino, 1899. Unannotated diplomatic edition of Latin text followed by Italian translation. Introduction in Italian focuses on similarities between the VA and the Divine Comedy with extensive quotes from the latter.
  • Inguanez, Mauro, ed. “La Visione di Alberico.” Introduction by Antonio Mirra. Miscellanea Casinense 11(1931–32): 33–103. Contains an edition of this vision (pp. 83–103).
  • Marchand, Jean. L’autre monde au Moyen Age. Poèmes et récits de la vielle France 17. Paris: Boccard, 1940, 117–83. Includes brief historical introduction plus a bibliography of editions and selected studies, a brief description of the manuscript at Monte Cassino, and a French translation of text. Also includes the Voyage of St. Brendan and St. Patrick’s Purgatory.
  • MGH 7:793–94. Peter the Deacon, Chronica Monasterii Casinensis. Ed. by W. Wattenbach.
  • Saint–Victor, P. “La vision du frere Alberic.” Correspondant 8 (1844): 214–37. Brief introduction followed by a complete French translation of Latin text with notes making comparisons to the Divine Comedy, focusing on Dante’s possible knowledge of Alberic’s vision.
STUDIES
  • Ancona, Alessandro D’. I precursori di Dante. Florence: G. Sansoni, 1874, 3–66. Treats the antecedents of Dante in general. and gives some particular attention to the Paul, Brendan Tundale, Patrick and Alberic visions. He does not make firm connections between these and the Divine Comedy, but indicates a general millieu of vision literature, which does not detract from Dante’s originality.
  • Dinzelbacher, Peter. “Die ‘Vision Alberichs’ und die ‘Esdras–Apokryphe.” Studien und Mitteilungen zur Geschichte des Benediktiner–ordens und seine Zweige 87 (1976): 435–42. Discusses the VA in the context of apocryphal literature and especially the Visio Ezra, with a brief textual comparison.
  • Guercio, Luigi. Di alcuni rapporti tra le visioni medievali e la Divina Commedia. Rome: La Vita Letteraria, 1909.
  • Lauri, Achille. “Dei due Alberici da Settefrati, Monaci di Montecassino.” Rivista storica benedettina 6 (1911): 208–20. Distinguishes the monk Alberic of Settefrati (b. 1101) from the cardinal Alberic of Settefrati (b. 1008). Also discusses the influence of this vision on the Divine Comedy.
  • Ovidio, Francisco d’. Nuovi studi danteschi. Il Purgatorio. Milan: Hoepli, 1906, 433–69. In the context of Dante’s “Purgatorio” Ovidio discusses the non–eternal nature of punishment in the VA; also discusses the Vision of Tundale in this context.
  • Rasettl, Gerardo. “Die Vision Alberichs in einem Frasko des 13 Jahrhunderts.” L’illustrazione Vaticana  4(2)/Jg. 1933, 103ss.
  • Torraca Francesco, I precursori della “Divina Commedia,” in Le opere minori di Dante Alighieri. Florence: Sansoni, 1906, 311–40; also in Nuovi studi Danteschi nel VI centenario della morte di Dante, Naples: Federico e Ardia, 1921, 269–307.

The Girl Who Trod on a Loaf, by Hans Christian Andersen, Danish, 1859

Anonymous Apocalypse, (The Apocalypse of Zephaniah)

The Vision of Ansellus Scholasticus, French, 1032–52

SOURCES
  • Du Méril, Edelestand, ed. Poésies populaires latines antérieures au douzième siècle. Paris: Brockhaus et Avenarius, 1843, 200–17.Edition of Latin text with notes. Edition of Latin text with notes.
  • PL 151:643–52. Reprint of Du Méril (above).
  • Gamberini, Roberto, ed. Visio Anselli. Il racconto di Ansello Scolastico e dell’Anonimo sulla visione infernale di Oddone di Auxerre. Florence: Galluzzo, 2008. Edition of Latin text based on three known manuscripts with Italian translation and introduction.
  • Leclerq, Jean. “Une rédaction en prose de la ‘Visio Anselli Scholastici’ dans un manuscrit de Subiaco.” Benedictina 16 (1969): 188–95. Edition of Latin text with introduction that briefly describes the vision, compares the prose and verse versions, and confirms Wilmart’s thesis (see below) regarding the dedicatee of the vision.
STUDIES
  • Ermini, Filippo. “La ‘Visio Anselli’ e l’imitazione nella ‘Divina Commedia.” Medioevo Latini: Studi e ricerche. Ed. Filippo Ermini. Modena: Società tipografica modenese, 1938, 311–15.
  • Shoaf, Richard A. “Raoul Glaber et la ‘Visio Anselli Scholastici.” Cahiers de Civilization Médiévale 23 (1980): 215–19. Discusses the relationship of the two versions of the VAS with the vision of the Harrowing of Hell in Book 5 (after 1044) of the Historiarum libri cinque of Raoul Glauber (monk of St. Germain d’Auxerre from 1035).
  • Shoaf, Richard A. “The Visio Anselli Scholastici. Exegesis and the Frustration of Aethiop.” Mittellateinisches Jahrbuch 17 (1982): 46–50. Discusses how the devil’s frustrating role as the one who enlightens is treated with humor in the VAS.
  • Walther, Hans. Initia carminum ac versum medii aevi posterioris latinorum. Gottingen: Vandenlioeck & Ruprecht, 1959, p. 459, entry 9091. List of manuscripts and editions.
  • Wilmart, André. “La lettre–préface de la ‘Visio Anselli Scholastici.” Analecta Reginensia. Vatican City: Vatican Library, 1933, 283–85. Discusses the light that this letter from Ansellus to Odon, abbot of St. Germain, sheds on the writing of this vision. Presents a critical edition of the letter based on Vatican Reg. Lat. 73, fol. 56v and two additional mss.

The Vision of St. Ansgar, German, late 9th C.

SOURCES
  • AS 3 (Feb. 1):409–500. Edition of Latin text.
  • Klein, Darius M. “Ecstatic Vision of a Medieval Saint: The Vision of St. Ansgar.” http://christianlatin.blogspot.com/2008/09/ecstatic-vision-of-medieval-saint.html English translation of text from Rimbert’s Vita Anskarii.
  • MGH 2:690–92. Critical edition of Latin text by C. F. Dahlmann with brief introduction concerning mss and editions.
  • PL 18:962–64. Latin edition of St. Rimbert’s Vita Anskarii, from Mabillion, AB 6.
  • Robinson, Charles H., ed. Anskar, Apostle of the North 801–865. London: Society for the Propagation of the Gospel, 1921, 30–34. English translation of the Vita, which contains the Visio in Ch. 3. Includes a bibliography on the Vita, with information on mss on p. 21; bibliography on pp. 22–24.
  • Trillmich, W. “Vita Anskarii.” In Quellen des 9 and 11 Jahrhunderts zur Geschichte der Ham gburgischen Kirche and des Reiches. Ed. by R. Buchner. Darmstadt: P. unk., 1961, 3–133. Edition of text by Rimbert.
  • Waitz, G., ed. Rimbert’s Vita Anskarii. Hannover: Scriptores rerum Germanicarum, 1884. Discusses the mss and early editions in preface. Presents annotated, critical edition of Rimbert’s Latin text.

STUDIES

  • Haupt, Richard. Schriften des Vereins für Schleswig–Holsteinische Kirchengeschichte 2 (1926): 236–58.
  • Lammars, Walther. “Ansgar: Visionäre Erlebnisformen und Missionauftrag.” Speculum historiale. Festschrift for Johannes Spörl. Ed. by Clemens Bauer, et al. Freiburg: K. Alber, 1965, 541–58. Study of the relationship between Ansgar as visionary and as missionary.
  • Levison, Wilhelm. (Schriften des Vereins für Schleswig–Holsteinische Kirchengeschichte, 2 (1926): 163–65 on the Vita and the place of visions in this historical document.
  • Mehnert, G. “Ansgar als Visionär, Em Beitrag zur Geschichte des christlichen Vision des Frühmittelalters.” Schriften des Ve reins für Schleswig– Holsteinische Kirchengeschichte, 2 (Beitilge und Mitteilungen) 21(1965): 44–67. Examines the wider meaning of Ansgar as visionary, discussing twelve different visions occurring in the Vita Anskarii (in chs. 2–5, 9, 25, 27, 29, 35, 36, 38 and 40), with a recapitulation of previous scholarship, especially discussing related articles by Richard Haupt and Wilhelm Levison (above) on the Vita and the place of visions in this historical document.

B

The Vision of Barontus, French, 678–79

SOURCES

  • AS 3 March 25, 570–74. Edition of Latin vision preceded by commentary (567–69).
  • Ciccarese, 236–75. Latin text based on MGH (130) with facing Italian translation. Includes brief introduction on the nature of this work with regard to the others in the collection. Provides some notes to the text.
  • MGH SRM 5:368–94. Annotated critical edition of Latin text. Introduction by W. Levison includes discussion of mss, brief description of vision, comparison to other visions.

STUDIES

  • Ciccarese, Maria Pia. “La ‘Visio Baronti’ nella tradizione letteraria delle visiones dell’aldilá.” Romano Barbarica 6. Rome: Herder, 1981–82, 25–52. Discusses the vision genre as related to the visions in the Dialogues of Gregory the Great and beginning in the seventh century. Describes the VB as a more original vision displaying imagination and narrative talent, while preserving the traditional style and themes of this genre.

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The Gospel of Bartholomew, Coptic, 5th–7th C.

SOURCES

The Apocalypse of Baruch, Ethiopic, after 550

SOURCES
  • Leslau, Wolf. Falasha Anthology. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1951, 69–74.

The Vision of Bernoldus, French, mid-9th

SOURCES
  • PL 125:1115–19. Edited from a codex of the monastery of Herivallensis.
STUDIES

The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, by William Blake,
English, 1793

The Vision of Bonellus, late 7th C.

SOURCES
  • Ciccarese, 286–92. Latin text based on Pousa (136) with facing Italian translation. Includes brief introduction (276–79) on the nature of this work with regard to the others in the collection. Provides some notes (298–301) to the text.
  • PL 87:433–35. Reprint of the diplomatic edition of the Latin text edited by Henrique Flórez et al., in Espana sagrada, 51 vols. (Madrid: Gabriel Ramirez, 1762), 16:382–85.
  • Pousa, Ramon Fernández, ed. San Valerio: Edicion critica con Xlll facsimiles. Madrid: Instituto Antonio de Nebrija, 1942, 115–18. Critical edition.
STUDIES
  • Aherne, Consuelo Maria, ed. Valerio of Bierzo: An Ascetic of the Late Visigothic Period. Washington, D.C.: Catholic University Press, 1949, 57–61. Brief discussion of the three visions (Baldarius, Bonellus, and Maximus) with comparison to Valerio’s autobiographical writings and to each other. Each of the visions is apparently related to Valerio by the visionary himself. Claims that “the accounts of the three visions are among the most interesting of Valerio’s writings.” Includes a general, select bibliography on Valerio.

The Vision of the Boy William, French, 1146

SOURCES
  • Vincent of Beauvais. Bibliotheca mundi seu Speculi maioris. Vol. 4, Speculum historiale. Douay: B. Belleri, 1624; rpt. ed. Graz: Akademische Druck–u. Verlagsanstalt, 1965, 1125–26. Book 27, ch. 84–85. Latin text entitled, De revelatione inferni facta Guillelinopuero.

STUDIES

The Life of Brendan, Irish, before 1000

The Voyage of St. Brendan, Irish, as early as 800

A Few Sighs from Hell or the Groans of the Damned Soul, John Bunyan, English, 1658

The Visions of John Bunyan, by George Larkin, English, 1711

C

The Dialogue on Miracles, by Caesarius of Heisterbach
(c. 1180–c. 1240), German, c. 1220–35

The Dialogue of Catherine of Siena (1347–1380), Italian, 1377–78

The Vision of Charles the Fat, French, c. 885

SOURCES

  • Gardiner, 129–33. Includes English translation of vision with notes and bibliography.
  • Hariulf. Chronicon Centulense ou Chronique de l’Abbeye de Saint–Riquier. Ed. by Ernest Prarond. Trans. by the Marquis Le Ver. Mémoires de la Socìété d’Emulation d’Abbeville. Abbeville: Fourdrinier, 1899, 153–58. French translation with a few notations and no real introduction.
  • Hariulf. “Die Vision Kaiser Karls III.” Neues Archiv der Gesellschaft für altere deutsche Geschichtskunde 27 (1902):399–08,493–502.
  • Hariulf. Chronique de l’Abbaye de Saint–Riquier. Ed. By Ferdinand Lot. Paris: Picard, 1894, 144–50. Introduction on the life and works of the author, as well as a discussion of the Chronicon Centulense, its sources and influences, the transmission of the text and the basis for this Latin edition.
  • PL 174:1287–91. Edition of Hariulf, Chronicon Centulense, reprinted from the Spicilegium Dachery.
  • William of Malmesbury. De Gestis Regum Anglorum Libri Quinque, Historiae Nouellae Libri Tres. Ed. By William Stubbs. Rolls Series 90. London: Public Record Office, 1807, 1:112–16. Annotated critical edition of Latin text.
  • William of Malmesbury. History of the Kings of England. Edited by John Sharpe. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme & Brown: 1815, 117–21. English translation of Gesta regum based on printed sources and mss, esp. London. B.L. Reg. 13, D. II. The vision appears in Bk. 2, ch. 2 (CE 855).
  • William of Malmesbury. Chronicle of the Kings of England. Ed. by J.A. Giles. London: Bohn, 1847, 102–5. English translation based on London, B.L. Reg. 13, D. II. Introduction discusses William, his writings, his style, and the early editions of his Chronicle.
STUDIES
  • Levison, Wilhelm.
  • Poupardin, Rene. “La date de la Visio Karoli tertii.” Bibliothèque de l’Ecole des chartes 64 (1903): 284–88. Dates the Vision of Charles the Fat to shortly after Charles’ death, placing it in or around the diocese of Rheims.
  • Silverstein, Theoodore. “‘Inferno’ XII 100–126 and the ‘Visio Caroli Crassi.’” Modern Language Notes 51 (1936): 9–52. Remarks on Dante’s precedent of the Vision of Charles the Fat for the punishment of those who out of greed for earthly things are guilty of bloodshed and rapine.

D

The Inferno, by Dante Aligheri, Italian , 1302–1321

The Voyage of the Descendants of Corra, Irish, 11th C.

SOURCES
  • Stokes, Whitley. “The Voyage of the Húi Corra.” Revue Céltique 14 (1893):26–69. Translation.

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The Dialogue on Miracles, by Caesarius of Heisterbach
(c. 1180–c. 1240), German, c. 1220–35

The Dialogue of Catherine of Siena (1347–1380), Italian, 1377–78

The Dialogues of Gregory the Great (540–604), Italian, 593-594

The Dream of Hell, by Raoul de Houdenc (c. 1165–c. 1230), French, early 13th C.

The Vision of Drythelm, by Venerable Bede (673–735 c.e.), English, 731

SOURCES
  • Ciccarese, 302–23. Latin text based on Colgrave with facing Italian translation. Includes brief introduction on the nature of this work with regard to the others in the collection. Provides some notes (332–36) to the text.
  • Colgrave, Bertram, and R. A. B. Mynors, ed. Bede’s Ecclesiastical History of the English People. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1969, 488–98. Parallel Latin text and English translation with English notes. Select bibliography includes editions, critical works, translations of the Historia; and editions of sources used by Bede.
  • Gardiner, 57–63. Includes an English translation of the vision with notes and bibliography.
  • Giles, J. A., ed. The Miscellaneous Works of Venerable Bede. 12 vols. London: Whittaker, 1843, 3:200–13. Latin critical edition with facing English translation.
  • PL 146:380–83. A Latin edition of Otloh of Emmeran’s Liber visionum. Vision 20 of this book is the VD from Bede’s Historia.
  • PL 95:247–52. Text of VD in Latin edition of Bede’s Historia.
  • Plummer, Charles, ed. Venerabilis Baedae. Historia Ecclesiasticam Gentis Anglorum. Oxford: Clarendon, 1896, 1:303–10, 2:294–98. Latin critical edition in volume 1; commentary in English in volume 2. Introduction, in English, discusses Bede’s life and work and the mss of the Historiam.
  • Roger of Wendover. Chronica, sive Flores historiarum. Edited by Henry O. Coxe. 3 vols. London: English Historical Society, 1841; rpt. Vaduz: Kraus, 1964, 1:190–95. Diplomatic edition of Latin text with annotations.
  • Roger of Wendover. Flowers of History. Edited by J. A. Giles. 2 vols. Bohn: London, 1849; rpt. New York: AMS, 1968, 1:120–22. English translation based on Coxe edition preface discusses Roger, the nature of his work, and his sources.
STUDIES
  • Wallace–Hadrill, J. M. Bede’s Ecclesiastical History of the English People: A Historical Commentary. Oxford: Clarendon Press, New York: Oxford University Press, 1988, 185–86. A commentary on the text of the Historia, which includes an extensive bibliography.

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E

The Elijah Fragment, 5th C.

SOURCES
  • Stone, Michael E. and John Strugnell. The Books of Elijah, Parts 1 and 2. Texts and Translations 18; Pseudepigrapha Series 8. Missoula, MT: Scholars Press, 1979, 14–15.
STUDIES
  • Lieberman, Saul. Texts and Studies. New York, KTAV, 1974, Chapter: “On Sins and Their Punishments.”

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The Vision of an English Novice, or Vision of an English Man, English, last decade of 12th C.

SOURCES

  • Vincent of Beauvais. Bibliotheca mundi seu Speculi maioris. Vol. 3, Speculum morale. Douay: B. Belleri, 1624; rpt. ed. Graz: Akademische Druck–u. Verlagsanstalt, 1965, 739.

STUDIES

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The Evernew Tongue, Irish, 11–12th C.

The Apocalypse of Ezra [Esdras], Greek, 150–850 and The Vision of Ezra, 4th–7th C.

SOURCES
  • Bogaert, Pierre–Maurice. “Un version longue inédite de la Visio beati Esdrae.Revue Benedictine 94:1–2 (1984):50–70. Annotated Latin text of Barberini Lat. 2318 with lexicon. Introduction on text and ms tradition especially in the light of the version presented in the long edition and its relationship to other versions.
  • Bogaert, Pierre–Maurice. “Anecdota apocrypha latina. Una ‘Visio’ ed una‘Revelatio’ d’Esdra con un decreto di Clemente Romano.” Nota di letteratura biblica e cristiana antica. Studi e testi 5. Rome: Vatican, 1901, 61–81. Presents Latin texts with brief introduction.
  • Mussafia, Adolfo. Sulla Visione di Tundalo. Vienna: C. Gerold, 1871, appendix, 202–6. Includes an edition of the Latin text.
  • Shutt, R.J.H. “Visio Beati Esdrae.” In Apocryphal Old Testament. Ed. by H. S. Sparks. New York: Oxford University Press, 1984, 947–51. English translation of Latin text with brief introduction.
  • Wahl, Otto, ed. Apocalypsis Esdrae, Apocalypsis Sedrach, Visio Beati Esdrae. Pseudepigrapha Veteris Testamenti Graece 4. Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1977. Includes bibliography; introduction discusses mss, editorial method, other versions (Syrian, Arabic, Ethiopian, Armenian). Presents editions of Greek Apocalypsis Esdrae and Apocalypsis Sedrach and of Latin Visio Beati Esdrae and Visio Esdrae in facing columns. Review by Pierre–Maurice Bogaert, Scriptorium 33 (1979): 120–21.
STUDIES
  • Bratke, Prof. “Beatus v. Libana, Hieronymus und die ‘Visio Hesdrae.’” Zeitschrift für Kirchengeschichte 23 (1902):429–30. Brief review article.
  • Dinzelbacher. Discusses the Vision of Alberic in the context of apocryphal literature and especially the Visio Esdrae, with a brief textual comparison.
  • Seymour. “The Bringing Forth of the Soul in Irish Literature.”
  • Stone, M. E. “The Metamorphosis of Ezra: Jewish Apocalypse and Medieval Vision.” Journal of Theological Studies n.s. 33 (1982):1–18. Discusses the Fourth Book of Ezra and the relationship of various other Ezra materials to it and to each other, including: the Greek Esdrae Apocalypse, the Greek Sedrach Apocalypse, and the Visio Beati Esdrae.
  • Wahl, Otto. “Vier Neue Textzeugen der ‘Visio beati Esdrae.’” Salesianuin 40:3 (1978): 583–90.Discusses four mss and the ms recensions.

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F

The Vision of Fatima, by Lucia Santos, Portuguese, 1917

SOURCES

  • Fatima in Lucia’s Own Words, ed. by Louis Kondor, 10th ed. (Fatima: Segretariado dos Pastorinhis, 1998), p. 170.

The Vision of Furseus, by Venerable Bede (673–735 c.e.), English, 731

SOURCES
  • AS 2 January 16, 36–41. Edition of Latin text of vita.
  • Ciccarese, Maria Pia. “Le Visioni di S. Fursa.” Romano barbarica 8 Rome: Herder, 1984–85, 231–303. Critical Latin edition of the Vita sancti Fursei, as a corrective to the Krusch edition (MGH SRM 4:423–51) which omits the visions. Introduction includes stemma codicum and discussion of ms tradition and the more significant textual variants, as well as a discussion of the life of Furseus and the relationship between his vision and his life.
  • Ciccarese, 394–401. Latin text based on Colgrave with facing Italian translation. Includes brief introduction on the nature of this work with regard to the others in the collection. Provides some notes to the text.
  • Colgrave, 3268–77. Parallel Latin text and English translation with English notes. Select bibliography includes editions, critical works, translations of the Historia; and editions of sources used by Bede.
  • Gardiner, 51–55. Includes an English translation of the vision with notes and bibliography.
  • Giles, 2:236–39. Latin critical edition with facing English translation.
  • MGH SRM 4:423–51.
  • PL 95:145–49. Text of VF in Latin edition of Bede’s Historia.
  • Plummer, 1:164–67, 2:169–74. Latin critical edition in volume 1; commentary in English in volume 2. Introduction, in English, discusses Bede’s life and work and the mss of the Historiam.
STUDIES
  • Foster, 22:456, 648. Description and bibliography of the Middle English Vision of Fursey (Furseus).
  • Wallace–Hadrill, J. M. Bede’s Ecclesiastical History of the English People: A Historical Commentary. Oxford: Clarendon Press, New York: Oxford University Press, 1988, 185–86. A commentary on the text of the Historia, which includes an extensive bibliography.

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G

The Vision of a German Count, before 1073

SOURCES
  • Vossler, K. La ‘Divina Commedia’: studiata nella sua genesi e interpretata. Bari: G. Laterza, 1927, 1:186–87; new ed. Bari: Laterza, 1983.
  • Ovidio, Francesco d’. Studi sulla “Divina Commedia.” Caserta: Moderna, 1931, 297.

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The Vision of Gottschalk, German, 1189–90

SOURCES
  • Assmann, Erwin. Godeschalcus und Visio Godeschalci. Quellen und Forschungen zur Geschichte Schleswig–Holsteins 74. Karl Wachholtz Verlag, 1979. Introduction includes a discussion of Gottschalk and his vision, the tramsmission of the story, the three mss, the printed editions, and the author of the two Latin versions edited here, one following the other, with facing translations into German. Includes a discussion of editorial method and nguistic notes on the language, style, and vocabulary.
  • Usinger, R., ed. “Vision Godeschalci.” Quellen und Forschungen für Geschichte Schleswig–Holsteinisch-Lauenburgische Geschichte 4 (1875): 73–126. Edition (89–126) of Latin text with introduction and notes.
STUDIES
  • Dinzelbacher, Peter. “Verba hec tam mistica ex ore tam ydiote glebonis.” In Volksreligion im hohen und späten Mittelalter. Ed. by P. Dinzelbacher and D. Bauer. Paderborn: F. Schöningh, 1990, 57–99. Discusses the evidence of folk belief in the Vision of Gottschalk.
  • Greven, Joseph. “Die Vision des Holsteiners Gottschalk.” Deutsches Dante-Jahrbuch 7 (1923):39–58. Discusses the two versions of the VG in the light of the reletionship of vision literature to the Divine Commedy.
  • Gurevich, A. “Oral and Written Culture of the Middle Ages: Two ‘Peasant Visions’ of the Late Twelfth–Early Thirteenth Centuries.” Tr. by Ann Shukmen. New Literary History 16 (1984):51–66. Discusses the problem of the interrelationship of oral and written traditions of the Visio Thurkilli and the VG, which are in constant and complex interaction.
  • Lammers, Walther. Gottschalks Wanderung im Jenseits. Zur Folksfrömmigkeit im 12. Jahrhundert nördlich der Elbe.” Weisbaden: F. Steiner, 1982.
  • Liestøl, 91–96. Synopsis of the VG and a discussion of it as a possible source for the Vision of Olav Asteson (Draumkvaede).
  • Piel, Manuela. Visionen und Träume als mittelalterliche Quellen am Beispiel der “Visio Godeschalci.” Munich: GRIN Verlag, 2007.
  • Rockelein.

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The Dialogues of Gregory the Great (540–604), Italian,
593-594

SOURCES
  • de Vogüé, Adalbert, ed. Gregoire le Grand: Dialogues. Trans. by Paul Antin. 3 vols. Paris: Cerf, 1978–80, 3:116–25. Annotated Latin critical edition with facing French translation. Vol. 1 includes an introduction and bibliography.
  • Gardiner, 47–50. Includes English translation of visions with notes and bibliography.
  • Gardner, Edmund, ed. The Dialogues of Saint Gregory. London: Philip Lee Warner, 1911, 223–26. English translation. General introduction on the Dialogues, their sources, influences, and transmission. Briefly mentions (p. xxv) the beginning of the western tradition of visions of heaven and hell in Gregory’s Dialogues.
  • The Dialogues of S. Gregoire. Ilkley (England): Scolar Press, 1975; rpt of Paris: Douai [Charles Boscard], 1608.
  • Gregory the Great. Dialogues. Trans. by Odo John Zimmerman. New York: Fathers of the Church, 1959, 237–41. English translation, with a few annotations, based on Moricca. Introduction provides a brief biography of Gregory and a brief introduction to the dialogues.
  • Moricca, Umberto, ed. Gregorii Magni Dialogi. Istituto storico italiano: Fonti per la storia d’Italia 57. Rome: Tip. dei Senato, 1924. Critical edition of Latin text based primarily on Milan, Ambrosiana B. 159 sup. Introduction covers the date of composition; authenticity, scope and nature of the dialogues; the sources for the dialogues; the locations of the miracles; chronological determination of some of the miracles; the contents of the dialogues; the dialogues as a historical source; editions and manuscripts.
  • PL 77:381–88. Annotated edition of text in Latin and Greek in facing columns.
STUDIES
  • Gatch, Milton McC. “The Fourth Dialogue of Gregory the Great: Some Problems of Interpretation.” In Studia Patristica 10, part 1. Ed. by F. L. Cross. Berlin: Akademie–Verlag, 1970, 77–83. Discusses the idea of purgatory in relation to Bk. 4 of Gregory’s Dialogues where the idea of post–mortem purgation is clearly presented. Gatch believes this is not the early beginning of the formulation of the concept of a Christian purgatory but a view of the Last Judgment temporally telescoped by Gregory’s belief that he is living in the age of the apocalypse. Gatch sees the Dialogues as a popular work by Gregory and not really a serious theological treatise from which to derive doctrinal developments.
  • Petersen, Joan M. The Dialogues of Gregory the Great in Their Late Antique Cultural Background. Studies and Texts 69. Toronto: Pontifical Institute, 1984. A reassessment of the Dialogues in relation to their sixth–century literary and theological background and to modern hagiographical research. Discusses particularly form and interpretation, the martyr stories, the miracle stories, relics and the spirituality of the desert. Extensive bibliography on primary sources and secondary work
  • Silverstein, Theodore. “The ‘Vision of Leofric’ and Gregory’s Dialogues.Review of English Studies 9 (April 1933): 186–88. Discusses the bridge in Leofric, which resembles somewhat the bridge in a later (fourth century) Latin redaction of the Visio Pauli. However, he concludes, it is clearly dependent on the bridge in the Dialogues of Gregory and therefore does not present a reason to suspect an earlier date of composition for this redaction of the VP.

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The Vision of Guibert of Nogents’s Mother, French, c. 1116

SOURCES
  • Archambaut, Paul J., ed. and trans. A Monk’s Confession: The Memoirs of Guibert of Nogent. College Park, PA: Penn State Press, 1995, 64–68.
  • Benton, John F. Self and Society in Medieval France. New York: Harper & Row, 1970, 93–97. English translation (based on the translation of Bland, below) of the memoirs of Abbot Guibert of Nogent, with introduction.
  • Bland, C.C. Swinton. The Autobiography of Guibert of Nogent. Intro, by G. G. Coulton. London: Routledge, New York: Broadway Translations, 1925, 73–79. English translation of Latin text.
  • Bourgin, Georges, ed. Guibert de Nogent: Histoire de sa Vie. Collection de textes pour servir à I ‘étude et à l’enseignemeni de l’histoire. Paris: Picard, 1907. Modern edition of Latin text.
  • Le Goff, Jacques. The Birth of Purgatory. Translated by Arthur Goldhammer. Chicago: Chicago University Press, 1984 (originally published as La naissance du purgatoire. Paris: Gallimard, 1981), pp. 181–86. In the context of a study on the development of Purgatory in the twelfth century and the relationship of that development to the social history of the period, a brief discussion of the importance of the Guibert text with an English translation based on the translation in Benton (above).
  • PL 156:876–77. Edition of the Latin text of Guibert abbatis De Vita sua libri tres.

STUDIES

  • McLaughlin, Mary M. “Survivors and Surrogates: Children of Parents from the Ninth to Twelfth Centuies.” The History of Childhood. Ed. by Lloyd deMause. New York: Psychohistory Press, 1975, 101–81. Discusses the childhood of Guibert and his relationship to his mother.
  • Paul, J. “Le démoniaque et l’imaginaire dans le De Vita sua de Guibert de Nogent.” In Le Diable au Moyen Age. Senefiance 6. Aix-en-Provence: CUERMA, Paris: H. Champion, 1979, 371–99. Discusses the presence of the devil in Guibert’s work, which should not he interpreted as an effort by the clergy to edify the laity but as a reflection of a real belief in the devil.

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The Vision of Gunthelm, English, second half of twelfth century (variously dated: before 1156, 1161, 1187)

SOURCES
  • Constable, Giles, ed. “The Vision of a Cistercian Novice.” Studia Anselmiana 40 (1956): 95–98. Edition of Latin text based on Cambridge, Sidney Sussex College 95. Brief introduction on ms, which originally contained 500 visions and miracles, mostly associated with the Virgin.
  • Constable, Giles, ed. “The Vision of a Cistercian Novice.” In Petrus Venerabilis, 1156–1956. Rome: Herder, 1956, 95–96. Diplomatic edition of Latin text from Cambridge, Sidney Sussex College 95. Introduction discusses the ms and the role of this vision in the controversy between the Cluniacs and the Cistercians and in the controversy between public and private confession.
  • Constable, Giles, ed. “The Vision of Gunthelm and Other Visions Attributed to Peter the Venerable.” Revue Bénédictine 66 (1956): 92–114. Rpt. with addenda in Giles Constable, Cluniac Studies (London: Variorum Reprints, 1980). Provides critical edition of VG and two visions of a monk of Savigny based on Brussels, B.R. II. 942 with variants from Copenhagen, Kongelige Bib. Gl. kgl. S. 136; Paris B.N. Lat. 14463; St. Omer, Bib. Mun. 328; and Brussels, B.R. 7797–806. Thorough introduction on the attribution of this work to Peter the Venerable (to whom several visions were attributed), its subsequent adaptation by Helinand and Vincent of Beauvais, its use in Mary legends, and its influence, especially on the Vision of Thurkill and the Vision of Olav Asteson.
  • PL 212:1060–63. Edition of Latin text of Helinand’s Chronicle without annotation.
  • Vincent of Beauvais, 1187, Bk. 29, ch. 6. Abbreviated version of the Latin visio called De novicio Cisterciensi tenate à sathana.

STUDIES

  • Liestøl, 87–91. Synopsis of the VG and a discussion of it as a possible source for the Vision of Olav Asteson (Drawnkvaede).

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H

Hell in Texas, American, before 1907

The Vision of Heriger, German, 10th/11th C.

SOURCES

  • Allen, Philip S., and Howard M. Jones, eds. The Romanesque Lyric. Chapel Hill, N.C.: University of North Carolina Press, 1928, 278–79. English verse translation; unannotated. Describes VH as the “earliest known example of that happy–go–lucky attitude toward the saints and their celestial abode so popular in later centuries.”
  • Breul, Karl. The Cambridge Songs. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1915, 59–60. Unannotated Latin text.
  • Du Méril, pp. 298–302. Annotated Latin edition.
  • Gaselee, Stephen, ed. The Oxford Boot of Medieval Latin Verse. Oxford: Clarendon, 1928, 66–68. Latin text.
  • Raby, F.J.E., ed. The Oxford Book of Medieval Latin Verse. Oxford: Clarendon, 1959, 170–71. Latin text.
  • Waddell, Helen. Medieval Latin Lyrics. New York: Henry Holt & Co., 1933, 148–55. English verse translation with facing Latin from the ms of St. Augustine of Canterbury.
  • The Book of Divine Works, by Hildegard of Bingen
    (1098–1179), German, 1163-1173/1174

    SOURCES
    • Hildegard of Bingen. Il libro delle opere divine. Ed. by Marta Cristiani and Michela Pereira,with intro. by Marta Cristiani. Trans. by Michela Pereira. Milan: Arnoldo Mondadori Editore, 2003. Italian translation of Latin text.
    • Hildegard of Bingen. Das Buch vom Wirken Gottes. Liber divinorum operum. Trans. by Mechthild Heieck. Augsburg: Pattloch, 1998. German translation of Latin text.
    • Hildegardis Bingensis: Liber divinorum operum. Corpus Christianorum, Continuatio Mediaevalis. 92. Ed. Albert Derolez and Peter Dronke. Turnhout: Brepols, 1996. Latin edition with English introduction.
    • Hildegard of Bingen. Le Livre des oeuvres divines (Visions). Trans. by Bernard Gorceix. Spiritualités vivantes 79. Paris: Albin Michel, 1989. French translation of Latin text.
    • Hildegard of Bingen. Book of Divine Works (Liber divinorum operum). Ed. by Matthew Fox. Santa Fe: Bear & Company 1987. English translation.
    • Hildegard of Bingen. Welt und Mensch. Das Buch “De operatione Dei.” Trans. and ed. by Heinrich Schipperges. Salzburg: O. Müller, 1965. German translation of Ghent manuscript with bibliographical references.

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  • I

    The Inferno, by Dante Aligheri, Italian, 1302–1321

    The Testament of Isaac, Arabic, Coptic, 894/5

    SOURCES
    • Kuhn, K. H. “An English Verion of the Sahidic Version of the Testament of Isaac.” Journal of Theological Studies, new series 18 (1967):332–33.

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    J

    The Way of Hell and Paradise, by Jean de la Mote, 14th. C.

    The Vision of John, Monk of St. Lawrence of Leige, the Low Countries, 1149–58

    SOURCES
    • PL 180:177–86. Edition of Latin text.

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    A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, by James Joyce, Irish, 1916

    K

    The Spanish Tragedy, by Thomas Kyd (1558-1594), English, 1586

    L

    The Vision of Laisrén, Irish, late 9th/early 10th C.

    BIBLIOGRAPHY

    SOURCES

    • Meyer, Kuno, ed. and trans. “The Vision of Laisrén.” Otia Merseiana 1(1899): 113–19. Presents an edition of the Irish text and a translation into English, with notes, from Oxford, Bodleian Rawlinson B. 512, a fifteenth–century manuscript.
    STUDIES
    • Grosjean, Paul. “Notes d’hagiographique celtique: Un fragment des Costumes de Tallaght et la Vision de Laisrén.” Analecta Bollandiana 81.1–2 (1963):251–72. Discusses text found in Stowe C.1.2 of the Royal Irish Academy (Dublin), which contains a fragment of VL and discusses primarily the dating of the work based on this Irish text, referring to Meyer’s work, above.

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    The Visions of John Bunyan, by George Larkin, English, 1711

    The Vision of Lazarus, German, 15th C.

    SOURCES
    • Voigt, Max. Beitrage zur Geschichte der Visionenliteratur im Mittelalter. Leipzig: Mayer & Miller, 1924; rpt. New York: Johnson Reprint, 1967, 1–118. Edition of the German text with notes. Introduction includes material on the Lazarus legend, the antecedents for this vision, the mss, and the language of the mss.
    • Heseltine, G. C., ed. The Kalendar and Compost of Shepherds. London: P. Davies, 1930, 59–67. This edition of the Shepherd’s Calendar is “From the original edition published by Guy Marchant in Paris in the year 1493, and translated into English c. 1518; newly edited, for the year 1931.” This calendar incorporates a version of the VL.

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    The Great Divorce, by C. S. Lewis (1898–1963), English, 1946

    Abbreviations

    AB Analecta Bollandiana. Brussels: Société des Bollandistes, 1882– .
    AS Acta Sanctorum, editio novissima. J, Carnadet et. al., ed. Paris: Palmé, 1863– .
    BHL Bibliotheca hagiographica latinae antiquae et mediae aetatis. Brussels: Socii Bollandiani, 1898– .
    Ciccarese Ciccarese, Maria Pia. Visioni dell’Aldilà in Occidente. Florence: Nardini Editore, 1987.
    Gardiner Gardiner, Eileen. Visions of Heaven and Hell before Dante. New York: Italica Press, 1989.
    Hennecke Hennecke, Edgar, Wilhelm Schneemelcher, R.McL. Wilson. New Testament Apocrypha. Philadelphia: Westminster Press, 1963–65.
    James, ANT James, Montague Rhodes. The Apocryphal New Testament. Oxford: Clarendon, 1924.
    MGH Monumenta Germaniae Historica. Scriptores rerum Germanicarum und Scriptores nova ser. Hannover: Gesellschaft für ältere deutsche Geschichtskunde, 1826– .
    MGH PLAC Monumenta Germaniae historica. Poetae latini aevi Carolini. Hannover: Gesellschaft für ältere deutsche Geschichtskunde, 1880–1951.
    MGH SRM Monumenta Germaniae historica. Scriptores rerum Merovingicarum. Hannover: Gesellschaft für ältere deutsche Geschichtskunde, 1884–1920 .
    PL Patrologiae cursus completus. Series Latina. J.-P. Migne, ed. Paris: Migne, 1844–65.
    Vincent of Beauvais • Vincent of Beauvais. Bibliotheca mundi seu Speculi maioris. Vol. 4, Speculum historiale. Douay: B. Belleri, 1624; rpt. ed. Graz: Akademische Druck–u. Verlagsanstalt, 1965.

    Related Topics
    About Judeo-Christian Hell
    Judeo-Christian Texts
    Judeo Christian Images


    Comments or Questions?
    rev. 2/17/2014